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August 12, 2022 10:16 am

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Euro 2022: England survive chaotic goalmouth scramble in final against Germany – BBC

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Euro 2022: England survive chaotic goalmouth scramble in final against Germany  BBC

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NYPD: 1 dead, 1 arrested following stabbing in Bronx smoke shop – News 12 New Jersey

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NYPD: 1 dead, 1 arrested following stabbing in Bronx smoke shop  News 12 New Jersey

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What Made Bill Russell a Hero

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Not many people can make Charles Barkley, the former NBA MVP and legendarily outspoken broadcaster, pipe down. But the NBA icon Bill Russell, who died on Sunday aged 88, once called Barkley and did just that.

“He called me. ‘Charles Barkley, this is Bill Russell.’ I said, ‘Oh hey, Mr. Russell,’” Barkley told me. “He said, ‘I need you to shut the fuck up.’ I said, ‘Okay.’”

Russell had seen Barkley on television complaining about how much he paid in taxes. Russell was displeased with Barkley’s comments.

“[Russell] said, ‘Son, let me tell you something,” Barkley said. “‘You grew up poor. You went to public school, and I bet the police came to your neighborhood when somebody called the cops.’ I said, ‘Yes, Mr. Russell.’ He said, ‘Somebody was paying those people and you didn’t have any money. I don’t ever want to see your Black ass on TV complain about taxes ever again.’ And I never did.”

Russell’s record—11 NBA championships as a player and a coach with the Boston Celtics—came to define winning. More than that, though, his fierce dedication to speaking out against racial injustice, his deep sense of integrity and righteousness, have long been considered the gold standard for athlete activism. Today, many Black athletes revere Russell and regard him as their north star.

[Read: Wilt Chamberlain: the Babe Ruth of Basketball]

In 2018, when I was a sports journalist with ESPN, I asked the late Kobe Bryant what he had learned from Bill Russell about leadership. Russell had been the NBA’s first Black head coach, while he was still a player—and he had experienced painful and humiliating racist abuse, even as he built the Celtics into a powerhouse. Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash in 2020, told me:

He was dealing with a lot of racial issues in Boston. Stories of people throwing things at him during the game and yelling crazy things to him on the court. So [I asked him] how did you deal with it? He said, “Well, I internalized it. I felt like the best thing I could do was use that as fuel, as opposed to simply having an emotional outburst at them. I decided to use that as energy to enhance my performance.”

In an article for SLAM magazine in 2020, Russell wrote: “The Boston Celtics proved to be an organization of good people––from Walter Brown to Red Auerbach, to most of my teammates. I cannot say the same about the fans or the city.” Russell endured their calling him “baboon,” “coon,” and “nigger” during games. When Celtics fans were polled about how the team could increase attendance, Russell recalled, more than half responded: “have fewer Black guys on the team.” And he related how, while he and his family were living in Reading, Massachusetts, a predominantly white town north of Boston, “bigots broke into the house, spray-painted ‘Nigga’ on the walls, shit in our bed.”

The experience only seemed to make Russell more determined to use his voice to bring awareness to this country’s deep-seated racial problems. In 1967, he took part in the Cleveland Summit, a gathering of prominent Black athletes organized by the great NFL running back Jim Brown. Russell was among those who stood in solidarity with the boxer Muhammad Ali, who had been stripped of his heavyweight title and faced charges for refusing to serve in the Vietnam War.

Bill Russell about to dunk.


New York Daily News Archive / Getty

Long before LeBron James posted a picture of his 2012 Miami Heat team wearing hoodies to memorialize Trayvon Martin, the Black teenager who had been wearing a hoodie when he was killed by a vigilante who claimed self-defense, Russell was marching with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and speaking out about the treatment of Black people in America in the 1950s and ’60s.

Long before the University of Missouri football team threatened a boycott, in 2015, because of the university president’s mishandling of racism on campus, Russell oversaw the first integrated basketball camp in Jackson, Mississippi, after the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers in 1963. Russell went ahead with the initiative despite death threats.

And long before NBA players forced the league to halt play in 2020 after the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a 29-year-old Black resident of Kenosha, Wisconsin, Russell had led a boycott that was joined by his Black Celtics teammates and the Black players on the St. Louis Hawks, after a restaurant in Lexington, Kentucky, refused to serve Russell and his teammates before the exhibition game. (The game went on without them, with only the white players participating.)

According to Gary Pomerantz’s 2018 book, The Last Pass: Cousy, Russell, the Celtics, and What Matters in the End, Russell responded to a reporter’s question about the boycott by saying:

One of the ways the American Negro has attempted to show he is a human being is to demonstrate our race to the people through entertainment, and thus become accepted. I am coming to the realization that we are accepted as entertainers, but that we are not accepted as people in some places. Negroes are in a fight for their rights—a fight for survival—in a changing world. I am with these Negroes.

[Read: Michael Jordan speaks up about police violence]

That sense of solidarity with other Black athletes never left Russell, even after his basketball career was over. As a homage to Colin Kaepernick’s protest, Russell posted a photo of himself taking a knee while wearing the presidential medal of freedom that he’d received from President Barack Obama in 2011. (Full disclosure: I am a producer of the ESPN documentary series that Kaepernick and the director Spike Lee are making about the former quarterback’s banishment from pro football.) When the NBA players didn’t play after Blake’s shooting, Russell tweeted how proud he was of them for “standing up for what is right.”

Although players of this generation have largely been spared the same humiliating, painful racism that Russell experienced as he rose to become the NBA’s first Black superstar, his influence is foundational to Black athlete activism.

“It’s easy to be woke when you’re making $40 or $50 million a year,” Barkley told me. “I got a lot of respect for the guys who do speak up now. But when you’re making $5,000 a year, and living in the America that he was at the time, that’s what makes him a hero.”


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Russia pounds Ukrainian port; Putin announces global maritime ambitions

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2022-08-01T03:46:28Z

Russian missiles pounded Ukraine’s port city Mykolaiv on the Black Sea, as President Vladimir Putin signed a new naval doctrine casting the United States as Russia’s main rival and setting global maritime ambitions in the Black Sea and Arctic.

Putin did not mention the conflict in Ukraine during a speech marking Russia’s Navy Day on Sunday, but said the navy would receive hypersonic Zircon cruise missiles in coming months. The missiles can travel at nine times the speed of sound, outrunning air defences. read more

Navy Day celebrations in the port of Sevastopol were disrupted when five Russian navy staff members were injured by an explosion after a suspected drone flew into the courtyard of Russia’s Black Sea fleet, the Crimean port city’s governor, Mikhail Razvozhayev, told Russian media.

Reuters could not independently verify the battlefield reports.

Olga Kovitidi, a member of Russia’s upper house of parliament, told Russia’s RIA news agency that the attack was “undoubtedly carried out not from outside, but from the territory of Sevastopol”.

“Urgent search operations are being conducted in the city to track down the organisers of this terrorist act,” Kovitidi was quoted as saying.

Mykolaiv Mayor Oleksandr Senkevych said more than 12 missile strikes on Sunday, probably the most powerful on the city in five months of war, hit homes and schools, with two people confirmed killed and three wounded. Missile strikes continued into Sunday evening.

Ukrainian grain tycoon Oleksiy Vadatursky, founder and owner of agriculture company Nibulon, and his wife were killed in their home, Mykolaiv Governor Vitaliy Kim said on Telegram.

Headquartered in Mykolaiv, a strategically important city that borders the mostly Russian-occupied Kherson region, Nibulon specialises in the production and export of wheat, barley and corn, and has its own fleet and shipyard.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy described Vadatursky’s death as “a great loss for all of Ukraine”.

Zelenskiy added that the businessman – one of Ukraine’s richest with Forbes estimating his 2021 net worth at $430 million – had been building a modern grain market with a network of transhipment terminals and elevators.

“It is these people, these companies, precisely the south of Ukraine, which has guaranteed the world’s food security,” Zelenskiy said in his nightly address. “This was always so. And it will be so once again.”

Putin invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, setting off a conflict that has killed thousands, uprooted millions and deeply strained relations between Russia and the West.

The biggest conflict in Europe since World War Two has also stoked an energy and food crisis that is shaking the global economy. Both Ukraine and Russia are major suppliers of grain.

Zelenskiy said Ukraine may harvest only half its usual amount this year due to disruption to farming.

But an agreement signed under the stewardship of the United Nations and Turkey on July 22 provides for safe passage for ships carrying grain out of three southern Ukrainian ports.

The ship may leave Ukraine’s ports on Monday, a spokesperson for Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said.

Zelenskiy said Russia has been transferring some forces from the eastern Donbas region to the southern Kherson and Zaporizhizhya regions.

“But that won’t help them there. None of the Russian strikes will go unanswered by our military and intelligence officers,” he said.

After failing to quickly capture the capital, Kyiv, early in the war, Russia has turned its forces on Ukraine’s east and south.

Russia annexed Crimea in 2014 and Kyiv says Moscow is seeking to do the same with the Donbas region and link it to Crimea in the south. Russian-backed separatist controlled parts of the region before the invasion.

Russia said it had invited U.N. and Red Cross experts to investigate the deaths of dozens of Ukrainian prisoners held by Moscow-backed separatists.

Ukraine and Russia have traded accusations over a missile strike or explosion early on Friday that appeared to have killed the Ukrainian prisoners of war in the front-line town of Olenivka in eastern Donetsk.

The International Committee of the Red Cross condemned the attack and said it had not received permission to visit the site, while adding it was not its mandate to publicly investigate alleged war crimes. read more

Related Galleries:

A view shows a building on fire, as Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues, in Mykolaiv, in this handout picture released on July 31, 2022. State Emergency Service of Ukraine in Mykolaiv Region/Handout via REUTERS

A firefighter works to douse a fire in a building, as Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues, in Mykolaiv, in this handout picture released on July 31, 2022. State Emergency Service of Ukraine in Mykolaiv Region/Handout via REUTERS

Russian combat engineers take part in an operation to demine anti-personnel landmines in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict in Donetsk, Ukraine July 31, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko

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Video Winning Mega Millions ticket sold in Illinois – ABC News

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Disparity in police response: Black Lives Matter protests and Capitol riot. Feb 23. 2020 in review: A year unlike any other.

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Groundbreaking Black actor Nichelle Nichols, Lt. Uhura on ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 89

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Performer broke through stereotypes for Black women on television in the 1960s and shared 1st interracial kiss on a US show with William Shatner’s Captain Kirk Untitled-19-1024x640.jpg

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Brooklyn bickers: Is it Borough Park, or Boro Park? * Brooklyn Paper (Brooklyn Paper) It’s a neighborhood in southwestern Brooklyn of about 150,000 people, sharing borders with K… Add your highlights: briefly.co/anchor/Brookly… #brooklyn

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Brooklyn bickers: Is it Borough Park, or Boro Park? * Brooklyn Paper (Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a neighborhood in southwestern Brooklyn of about 150,000 people, sharing borders with K…

Add your highlights:

briefly.co/anchor/Brookly…

#brooklyn

The post Brooklyn bickers: Is it Borough Park, or Boro Park? * Brooklyn Paper (Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a neighborhood in southwestern Brooklyn of about 150,000 people, sharing borders with K…

Add your highlights:
briefly.co/anchor/Brookly…
#brooklyn
first appeared on The Brooklyn News.


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Ukrainian Ambassador reveals trigger for peace talks with Russia – Sky News Australia

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The post Ukrainian Ambassador reveals trigger for peace talks with Russia – Sky News Australia first appeared on The Brooklyn News.


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Crisis-hit Sri Lanka looks forward to enhancing ties with Russia: Report – Business Standard

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The post Crisis-hit Sri Lanka looks forward to enhancing ties with Russia: Report – Business Standard first appeared on The Brooklyn News.


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Column: If the Angels trade Shohei Ohtani, Arte Moreno might as well just give up

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… though New York Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge has been putting up … A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and graduate of Northwestern University’s …

The post Column: If the Angels trade Shohei Ohtani, Arte Moreno might as well just give up first appeared on The Brooklyn News.


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