Categories
Audio Posts Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠

February 20, 2021 – Shared Links Review

Spread the News

Listen to this article
February 20, 2021 – Shared Links Review

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ | In Brief | 

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks 
Recent Tweets
Steve Bannon believed Trump had dementia and plotted to remove him as president, according to new book | Investigation of Donald Trump and Trumpism trumpinvestigation.net: What role did the retired FBI agents play in Capitol riot? | In new defense, dozens of Capitol rioters say law enforcement let us in to building
In new defense, dozens of Capitol rioters say law enforcement let us in to building | Connect FM | Local News Radio
What role did the retired FBI agents play in Capitol riot?
More Oath Keepers on Capitol riot charges | The Canberra Times | Canberra, ACT
Why do COVID death rates seem to be falling?
President Biden Delivers Remarks at the Virtual Munich Security Conference
AP Top Stories February 19 A posted at 10:20:29
‘No Lockdown’-Sweden Sees COVID Deaths Plummet Quicker Than ‘Fully-Locked-Down’ UK posted at 11:10:03 UTC
Pelosi predicts vote on Biden $1.9T rescue plan next week – New York Post posted at 09:05:03 UTC
Audio Post – The Tip Of An Iceberg: Sexual Misconduct Within The FBI Is Exposed by AP! Investigate The Investigators who are nothing more and nothing less than a bunch of psychopaths, perverts, and child abusers. Abolish the FBI and put the criminal FBI agents in prison where they belong! The present crisis in America is the direct result of the FBI stupidity, treacherous incompetence and malfeasance.
Biden: White supremacists are the most dangerous people in America posted at 13:02:32 UTC
Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple posted at 22:25:31 UTC – SharedNewsLinks Review
Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple
New York’s Washington Square Park Turns Into Winter Wonderland posted at 19:46:33 UTC
NATO aircraft intercepted & driven out by Russian jets posted at 16:29:22 UTC
EU army warning: US and UK at risk from European military – MEP lifts lid on Macron’s plot – Daily Express posted at 15:18:39 UTC
One in THREE US military service members refuse COVID-19 vaccine – Daily Mail posted at 14:11:12 UTC
9:02 AM 2/18/2021 – McConnell’s plan to deal with Donald Trump: Ignore him
AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: Allison Janney is an ‘invisible woman’ in new dramedy posted at 10:45:49 UTC
Podcasts Review – Latest episodes – 5:32 AM 2/18/2021
Facebook sends blunt message to the world, blocking Australians’ access to news | ABC News posted at 09:35:20 UTC
Trump has a lot of money problems | FBI Reform posted at 09:16:34 UTC
Risky Encounters with Russia: Time to Talk About Real Deconfliction
S&P Global to assess defaults of countries using G20 debt relief plan – KFGO News posted at 20:27:39 UTC
Feed Integration by RSS Dog.

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks 
Recent Tweets

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

4:30 AM 2/13/2021 – INVESTIGATE THE INVESTIGATORS!!! | Pro-Trump faction within the FBI and Thomas Edward Caldwell | Feds need to tell us a lot more about the Capitol riot investigation (opinion) | Former FBI official … https://thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/430-am-2132021.html 

Steve Bannon believed Trump had dementia and plotted to remove him as president, according to new book | Investigation of Donald Trump and Trumpism trumpinvestigation.net: What role did the retired FBI agents play in Capitol riot? | In new defense, dozens of Capitol rioters say law enforcement let us in to building

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

picture
Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from 8110942.png Connect FM | Local News Radio | Dubois, PA.

U.S. Department of JusticeU.S. Department of Justice

By ALEXANDER MALLIN, ALEX HOSENBALL and OLIVIA RUBIN, ABC News

(WASHINGTON) As authorities continue to pursue individuals who participated in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol, a growing number of those charged are employing a new defense: blaming the police for letting them in.

At least 29 people arrested for their role in the Jan. 6 events have claimed they thought they were free to enter the Capitol because law enforcement authorities either didnt stop them from coming in or never told them they were not allowed to be there, according to affidavits and court filings reviewed by ABC News.

He was not at the front of the lines, he didnt see barricades being knocked down, he didnt see officers getting assaulted, he didnt see anything other than large crowds at the Capitol, Thomas Mayr, the lawyer for Christopher Grider, one of the people accused of participating in the riot, told ABC News. He went through an open door.

Grider, of Texas, is one of dozens of suspected rioters who claimed to be unaware they were not allowed inside some of whom argued that they were actually ushered in by officers. He now faces multiple charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Jacob Lewis of California told investigators he was never told that he could not enter the Capitol, and that he was escorted by police into the building. When reached by ABC News, Lewis said he would be releasing video footage to back up his story. He declined to share the video with ABC News. Lewis was indicted on four misdemeanor charges, including disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building.

Even as scrutiny of Capitol police continues to build, experts say it is unlikely such a defense will work in most situations.

In general, ignorance of the law is not an excuse for criminal behavior, said Taryn Merkl, senior counsel in the Justice Program at the Brennan Center for Justice and a former federal prosecutor in the Eastern District of New York.

Many accused rioters also face multiple charges for crimes they allegedly committed once inside the building, which experts say would render their claims of legal entry meaningless.

Whether or not people knew that it was not lawful to enter the grounds as they did, many are charged with parading, demonstrating, or picketing and that is prohibited, and no intent is required, Merkl said.

Brandon Fellows, for example, told investigators he did not think he was going to get in trouble because the police officers seemed to be on our side, but he was later seen with his feet up on the desk of Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.

Even if the officer had permitted him in the rotunda area or somewhere that might conceivably be a public space, anybody knows that breaking into a private senatorial office is wrongful, and would obstruct the administration of government, Merkl said.

U.C. Berkeley law professor Charles Weisselberg, a former public defender, said the defense might help those charged with crimes where intent is required.

If someone believes that they are allowed to do something, it might negate the intent thats otherwise required to convict, Weisselberg told ABC News. Whether it is successful or not depends on the facts, what they heard, saw, and believed, but I could see that being presented.

Merkl, however, noted that the majority of the rioters are charged under specific statutes that apply to the protection of the Capitol, for which prosecutors dont have to prove intent on the part of the accused.

Dimitry Shakhnevich, a criminal defense attorney and adjunct assistant professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, also said that defense wouldnt work.

If I leave my door open to my house, you cant bolt in, even though I left the door open, Shakhnevich said. Its still trespassing and making the argument that I impliedly consented to access by leaving my door open is silly.

Still, claims by those who say they were unaware they were committing illegal acts could sharpen the distinction between Trump supporters who may have gotten swept up in the moment and hardened extremists who went to the Capitol with plans to commit violence. An ABC News analysis of court records, military records, interviews and available news reports found that at least 19 of those arrested have associations or possible ties to extremist groups, including the Proud Boys, Oath Keepers and Three Percenters. Numerous individuals associated with those groups have since been charged with conspiracy.

And while some accused rioters say they believed law enforcement allowed them to enter, others are saying they believed they were acting under direct orders from then-President Donald Trump, who told his supporters at the rally before the attack that they should fight like hell and that he would be joining them on their march to the Capitol.

An ABC News analysis found at least a dozen rioters have mounted such a defense, a point that was raised multiple times by Democrats as they sought last week to convict Trump on charges that he directly incited the mob.

Weisselberg said that authorities prosecuting accused rioters will likely dispute such claims by pointing directly to what the rioters observed upon arriving at the Capitol.

Youre looking at the location where they entered, youre looking at the time that they entered, youre looking to see whether it would have appeared that that they were entering a restricted space, Weisselberg said. The prosecution might counter with other facts, arguing that for a person who came up to the building at this particular location, they actually couldnt have believed that they were entitled to enter because they saw broken glass, damage, and other things that should have been apparent to this person entering at that particular point in time.

The claims, whether successful or not, bring a renewed focus on the conduct of police that day. In the aftermath of the attack, officials began questioning why law enforcement was not better prepared, and numerous investigations have been opened in the weeks since.

Earlier this week, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced that Congress would create an outside commission to investigate the riot, including the preparedness and response of the United States Capitol Police and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement in the National Capitol Region.

The Senate is scheduled to hold its first hearing into the security preparations leading up to Jan. 6 next week, and has called current and former officials responsible for securing the U.S. Capitol building to testify.

Bryce Lowry Caldwell, an attorney for one of the alleged rioters, told ABC News they were looking into the actions of the Capitol Police as a possible defense.

Numerous individuals have been charged for being on a piece of property when they shouldnt be, he told ABC News. If someone let them on thats an issue.

Caldwells client, Jordan Revlett, had posted on Snapchat that a capitol police officer opened the door from inside to let us in, according to the FBI affidavit. Revlett also told investigators he did not see any signs that would have restricted his entry and that a police officer was standing behind the door he entered, who did not try to stop his entry.

Theres several other defendants who said the same, Caldwell told ABC News. I would feel safe to say thats an issue the Department of Justice would be looking into.

When asked for comment, a DOJ official referred ABC News to its previous statements that any individuals who intentionally committed a crime that day will be charged.

Investigations have since been opened into the actions of 35 Capitol Police officers, a congressional official told ABC News, and at least two officers have been suspended, according to Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio.

Other officers have been honored for their heroism in protecting the Capitol during the attack, which left five dead, including a Capitol Police officer, and injured dozens of officers.

Capitol police did not respond to ABC News request for comment.

I certainly believe that the Capitol Police role in this should be fully investigated, whether its by prosecutors or by the House Oversight Committee, said Merkl, the former federal prosecutor. There needs to be a review of what the Capitol Police role, if any, was in facilitating this or aiding and abetting it.

Nevertheless, Merkl said, the actions of the government arent on trial in a criminal case. Whats on trial is the action of the defendant.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

The post In new defense, dozens of Capitol rioters say law enforcement let us in to building | Connect FM | Local News Radio first appeared on My News Links – mynewslinks.com – Current News.

Cocooned in Mar-a-Lago, the newly acquitted ex-president is stepping up his political activities.
In new defense, dozens of Capitol rioters say law enforcement let us in to building | Connect FM | Local News Radio

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Connect FM | Local News Radio | Dubois, PA.

U.S. Department of JusticeU.S. Department of Justice

By ALEXANDER MALLIN, ALEX HOSENBALL and OLIVIA RUBIN, ABC News

(WASHINGTON) As authorities continue to pursue individuals who participated in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol, a growing number of those charged are employing a new defense: blaming the police for letting them in.

At least 29 people arrested for their role in the Jan. 6 events have claimed they thought they were free to enter the Capitol because law enforcement authorities either didnt stop them from coming in or never told them they were not allowed to be there, according to affidavits and court filings reviewed by ABC News.

He was not at the front of the lines, he didnt see barricades being knocked down, he didnt see officers getting assaulted, he didnt see anything other than large crowds at the Capitol, Thomas Mayr, the lawyer for Christopher Grider, one of the people accused of participating in the riot, told ABC News. He went through an open door.

Grider, of Texas, is one of dozens of suspected rioters who claimed to be unaware they were not allowed inside some of whom argued that they were actually ushered in by officers. He now faces multiple charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Jacob Lewis of California told investigators he was never told that he could not enter the Capitol, and that he was escorted by police into the building. When reached by ABC News, Lewis said he would be releasing video footage to back up his story. He declined to share the video with ABC News. Lewis was indicted on four misdemeanor charges, including disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building.

Even as scrutiny of Capitol police continues to build, experts say it is unlikely such a defense will work in most situations.

In general, ignorance of the law is not an excuse for criminal behavior, said Taryn Merkl, senior counsel in the Justice Program at the Brennan Center for Justice and a former federal prosecutor in the Eastern District of New York.

Many accused rioters also face multiple charges for crimes they allegedly committed once inside the building, which experts say would render their claims of legal entry meaningless.

Whether or not people knew that it was not lawful to enter the grounds as they did, many are charged with parading, demonstrating, or picketing and that is prohibited, and no intent is required, Merkl said.

Brandon Fellows, for example, told investigators he did not think he was going to get in trouble because the police officers seemed to be on our side, but he was later seen with his feet up on the desk of Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.

Even if the officer had permitted him in the rotunda area or somewhere that might conceivably be a public space, anybody knows that breaking into a private senatorial office is wrongful, and would obstruct the administration of government, Merkl said.

U.C. Berkeley law professor Charles Weisselberg, a former public defender, said the defense might help those charged with crimes where intent is required.

If someone believes that they are allowed to do something, it might negate the intent thats otherwise required to convict, Weisselberg told ABC News. Whether it is successful or not depends on the facts, what they heard, saw, and believed, but I could see that being presented.

Merkl, however, noted that the majority of the rioters are charged under specific statutes that apply to the protection of the Capitol, for which prosecutors dont have to prove intent on the part of the accused.

Dimitry Shakhnevich, a criminal defense attorney and adjunct assistant professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, also said that defense wouldnt work.

If I leave my door open to my house, you cant bolt in, even though I left the door open, Shakhnevich said. Its still trespassing and making the argument that I impliedly consented to access by leaving my door open is silly.

Still, claims by those who say they were unaware they were committing illegal acts could sharpen the distinction between Trump supporters who may have gotten swept up in the moment and hardened extremists who went to the Capitol with plans to commit violence. An ABC News analysis of court records, military records, interviews and available news reports found that at least 19 of those arrested have associations or possible ties to extremist groups, including the Proud Boys, Oath Keepers and Three Percenters. Numerous individuals associated with those groups have since been charged with conspiracy.

And while some accused rioters say they believed law enforcement allowed them to enter, others are saying they believed they were acting under direct orders from then-President Donald Trump, who told his supporters at the rally before the attack that they should fight like hell and that he would be joining them on their march to the Capitol.

An ABC News analysis found at least a dozen rioters have mounted such a defense, a point that was raised multiple times by Democrats as they sought last week to convict Trump on charges that he directly incited the mob.

Weisselberg said that authorities prosecuting accused rioters will likely dispute such claims by pointing directly to what the rioters observed upon arriving at the Capitol.

Youre looking at the location where they entered, youre looking at the time that they entered, youre looking to see whether it would have appeared that that they were entering a restricted space, Weisselberg said. The prosecution might counter with other facts, arguing that for a person who came up to the building at this particular location, they actually couldnt have believed that they were entitled to enter because they saw broken glass, damage, and other things that should have been apparent to this person entering at that particular point in time.

The claims, whether successful or not, bring a renewed focus on the conduct of police that day. In the aftermath of the attack, officials began questioning why law enforcement was not better prepared, and numerous investigations have been opened in the weeks since.

Earlier this week, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced that Congress would create an outside commission to investigate the riot, including the preparedness and response of the United States Capitol Police and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement in the National Capitol Region.

The Senate is scheduled to hold its first hearing into the security preparations leading up to Jan. 6 next week, and has called current and former officials responsible for securing the U.S. Capitol building to testify.

Bryce Lowry Caldwell, an attorney for one of the alleged rioters, told ABC News they were looking into the actions of the Capitol Police as a possible defense.

Numerous individuals have been charged for being on a piece of property when they shouldnt be, he told ABC News. If someone let them on thats an issue.

Caldwells client, Jordan Revlett, had posted on Snapchat that a capitol police officer opened the door from inside to let us in, according to the FBI affidavit. Revlett also told investigators he did not see any signs that would have restricted his entry and that a police officer was standing behind the door he entered, who did not try to stop his entry.

Theres several other defendants who said the same, Caldwell told ABC News. I would feel safe to say thats an issue the Department of Justice would be looking into.

When asked for comment, a DOJ official referred ABC News to its previous statements that any individuals who intentionally committed a crime that day will be charged.

Investigations have since been opened into the actions of 35 Capitol Police officers, a congressional official told ABC News, and at least two officers have been suspended, according to Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio.

Other officers have been honored for their heroism in protecting the Capitol during the attack, which left five dead, including a Capitol Police officer, and injured dozens of officers.

Capitol police did not respond to ABC News request for comment.

I certainly believe that the Capitol Police role in this should be fully investigated, whether its by prosecutors or by the House Oversight Committee, said Merkl, the former federal prosecutor. There needs to be a review of what the Capitol Police role, if any, was in facilitating this or aiding and abetting it.

Nevertheless, Merkl said, the actions of the government arent on trial in a criminal case. Whats on trial is the action of the defendant.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

What role did the retired FBI agents play in Capitol riot?

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 

What role did the retired FBI agents play in Capitol riot? – GS

Oath Keepers – GS

Retired FBI agents and Oath Keepers – GS

Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI and Oath Keepers – GS

_______________________

More Oath Keepers on Capitol riot charges | The Canberra Times | Canberra, ACT

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The Canberra Times – Local News.

The six women and men arrested this week in Florida, North Carolina and Ohio are said to have collaborated with three other suspects who were already indicted in January.

They face various charges, including conspiring to obstruct congressional certification of the result of the 2020 presidential election.

In total, nine individuals with alleged ties to the right-wing group, which often use militia tactics, have been charged with conspiring to commit an offence against the United States.

AdChoices
ADVERTISING

 

According to the prosecutors, seven of the men and women wore paramilitary gear on January 6 and marched up the stairs of the Congress building in a military-style “stack” formation before breaking through the doors.

The indictment alleges that one of the suspects, who describes themself as the leader of the Oath Keepers in Florida, wrote in a Facebook message in late December: “Trump said It’s gonna be wild!!!!!!! It’s gonna be wild!!!!!!! He wants us to make it WILD that’s what he’s saying. He called us all to the Capitol and wants us to make it wild!!! Sir Yes Sir!!!”

Last Saturday, the Senate acquitted former president Donald Trump in an impeachment trial over his role in the deadly Capitol riots.

He had been charged with incitement of an insurrection, alleging his baseless allegations of voter fraud and speech during a rally on January 6 had propelled a deadly mob to storm the US Capitol.

Australian Associated Press

Why do COVID death rates seem to be falling?

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Nature – Issue – nature.com science feeds.

Many regions of the world have experienced the pandemic in punishing waves, but Chennai in India endured a six-month flood, according to Bharath Kumar Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan. The Apollo Main Hospital, where Vijayaraghavan works as an intensive-care specialist, was never overwhelmed, but it was relentlessly busy. And although the numbers of people with COVID-19 finally began to fall in mid-October, Vijayaraghavan worries about the possible impact of the festival season, which began on 20 October, and the publics waning compliance with health measures. Everybody is exhausted, he says. Its become a never-ending health-care problem.

One shining light that he can point to is his intensive-care units dwindling fatality rate. In April, up to 35% of those in the unit with COVID-19 perished, and about 70% of those on ventilators died. Now, the intensive-care mortality rate for people with the illness is down to 30%, and for those on ventilators it is around 4550%. This itself was a relief, says Vijayaraghavan.

Around the world, similar stories are emerging. Charlotte Summers, an intensive-care physician at the University of Cambridge, UK, says that data collected by the countrys National Health Service (NHS) show a decline in death rates1 (see Mortality falls). Critical-care physician Derek Angus at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania says that his hospitals statistics team also saw reductions over time. Without question, weve noticed a drop in mortality, says Angus. All things being equal, patients have a better chance of getting out alive.

The reasons are not entirely obvious. There have been no miracle drugs, no new technologies and no great advances in treatment strategies for the disease that has infected more than 50 million and killed more than 1.2 million around the world. Shifts in the demographics of those being treated might have contributed to perceived boosts in survival. And at many hospitals, it seems clear that physicians are getting incrementally better at treating COVID-19 particularly as health-care systems become less overwhelmed. Still, those gains could be erased by increasing case loads around the world.

Vijayaraghavan credits the improvements in mortality at his institution to hard-earned experience, a better understanding of how to use steroids and a shift away from unproven drugs and procedures.

Marcus Schultz, an intensive-care specialist at Amsterdam University Medical Center in the Netherlands, agrees, adding that it took time to realize that standard treatments were among the most effective. In just half a year, I think we repeated 20 years of research in acute respiratory distress, he says. Everything was done again, and everything came with the same result.

Crunching the numbers

Researchers have struggled to work out whether the COVID-19 death rates are truly dropping. The calculations can be complex. Case-fatality rates depend on testing: a country that tests only people with severe symptoms, for example, will have an outsized case-fatality rate compared with one in which asymptomatic testing is widespread. And fatality rates in intensive-care units can mislead if the demographics of the people admitted change over time. For example, many hospitals reported high numbers of younger patients as the pandemic wore on.

The detailed data that are needed to parse these differences have been hard to come by in many countries, and that frustrates Andrew Levin, an economist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. We still dont have the data that scientists and public-health officials should have, he says.

As a result, it has taken researchers some time to determine whether the number of deaths per SARS-CoV-2 infection is really falling, particularly for older people, says epidemiologist Ali Mokdad at the University of Washington in Seattle. Mokdad and his colleagues have been monitoring global data, with a focus on the United States and Europe. A provisional analysis, he says, which includes data from the American Hospital Association, now suggests that the number of fatalities per infection might have fallen by 20%.

Intensive-care physicians say that treatment has improved, but not always in ways that are easy to pinpoint. Vijayaraghavan and others credit a shift in mindset. In the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 was viewed as something frightening and new and worthy of resorting to unproven interventions in a desperate act to save patients. Unfortunately, a lot of the initial discourse was complicated by noise about how this disease was entirely different or entirely new, says Vijayaraghavan. This distraction caused more harm we were all probably poised to go off track.

Summers points to the furore around hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug that some initial studies suggested might help to treat COVID-19. The possibility set off a run on the drug, with some physicians and politicians advocating its use without strong evidence that it was effective. In June, a large study in the United Kingdom2 showed that the drug did not benefit people hospitalized with COVID-19. Meanwhile, that study and others suggested that hydroxychloroquine could be harming some patients, in particular by causing heart damage, and especially when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin3. Hundreds of hydroxychloroquine clinical trials were launched, wasting resources and effort that could have been directed elsewhere, says Summers. In terms of hospitalized patients, hydroxychloroquine is dead, says Summers. Thats one less thing for us to worry about.

Chasing miracles

Intensive-care physicians point to early concerns about the increased production of proteins called cytokines that can rev up immune responses in some people with severe COVID-19. This phenomenon, known as a cytokine storm, stimulated interest in using targeted therapies to dampen immune responses. Vijayaraghavan says that this prompted some physicians in India to treat COVID-19 with tocilizumab, an antibody that blocks the activity of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). But, he says, the treatment might have made patients more susceptible to other infections, a particular risk in regions where drug-resistant bacteria are common.

Since then, additional studies have shown that, although IL-6 levels are raised in some people with severe COVID-19 compared with healthy individuals or those with mild infections, they are not elevated when compared with others with acute respiratory distress4. Researchers have been looking without success at targeted ways to dampen immune responses in critically ill people for decades, says Angus. And we have 20 to 30 years of failing to improve outcome with therapies that try to block the cytokine cascade.

Some studies have borne out Anguss pessimism. A test of another IL-6-blocking antibody called sarilumab in the United States was halted because it showed no benefit, and a study of tocilizumab also found no effect on COVID-19 death rates5. A large, randomized, controlled clinical trial of tocilizumab taking place in the United Kingdom should have a result before the end of December, says Summers.

In contrast to more-targeted drugs, blanket suppression of the immune system using steroids has been shown to cut death rates when used to treat severe COVID-19. On 16 June, the UK RECOVERY trial found that a common steroid called dexamethasone could reduce COVID-19 fatalities by as much as one-third when administered to patients who require supplemental oxygen or are on ventilators6. (However, Summers cautions that dexamethasone treatment has not been shown to carry a benefit for people with mild COVID-19 who do not need oxygen support, possibly because it weakens defences against the virus itself.)

Some intensive-care physicians were already giving low doses of dexamethasone to critically ill patients as part of their standard treatment for acute respiratory distress, but the safety of that approach was debated. The RECOVERY trial results encouraged more to use the drugs, and the doses were low enough that infections did not increase, says Vijayaraghavan.

Thus far, steroids are the only medicine that has been shown to have a dramatic effect on COVID-19 mortality. Anyone whos very sick should get steroids, says Angus. And everything else is a crapshoot.

The antiviral drug remdesivir, developed by the biopharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences in Foster City, California, has been shown by a US National Institutes of Health study to shorten hospital stays7. A subsequent trial coordinated by the World Health Organization found that the drug had little, if any, effect on mortality, but the US Food and Drug Administration nevertheless approved it for treating COVID-19 on 22 October.

Hundreds of other therapies are being tested against COVID-19, but many of the ongoing trials are too small to yield convincing results soon. Among the furthest along are studies of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 either purified antibodies administered individually or in cocktails, or antibody-rich blood plasma taken from people recovering from the disease.

Convalescent plasma studies have been hampered in the United States by the widespread availability of the treatment outside clinical trials, but the UK RECOVERY trial hopes to have data on this approach from a large, randomized, controlled trial this year. Meanwhile, a 464-person, open-label study in India found that convalescent plasma did not prevent moderate COVID-19 from progressing to severe disease or reduce deaths8.

Tests of purified antibodies are also under way such as those assessing the mixture of two antibodies produced by the biotechnology firm Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in Tarrytown, New York, that was administered to US President Donald Trump. These mainly target people who have mild COVID-19 symptoms. Despite Trumps claims that the treatment was a cure, large trials of the cocktail have not yet been completed, and there is no evidence that it has an impact on death rates from COVID-19.

Some studies in people with mild disease have shown that treatment with these antibodies can reduce hospitalizations. However, in October, the US National Institutes of Health halted a trial of an antibody produced by the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly in Indianapolis, Indiana, in people hospitalized with COVID-19 after finding no benefit from the treatment. Regeneron has also stopped enrolment in a trial of its antibody cocktail for people with severe symptoms.

Researchers are also looking to find out whether drugs that prevent blood clots an unexpected hallmark of COVID-19 could be given at higher doses or earlier during infection.

Angus would like to see studies that test combinations of these treatments. He is an investigator for REMAP-CAP (Randomised, Embedded, Multi-factorial, Adaptive Platform Trial for Community-Acquired Pneumonia), a trial that spans more than 260 sites in 19 countries and is designed to allow treatments to be added or dropped. For example, remdesivir might be better in the presence of steroids, he says. We need trials that simultaneously randomize several choices.

Back to basics

Some intensive-care researchers are sceptical of the chances that a highly effective medicine will be found, citing decades of failed attempts to find a magic bullet for acute respiratory distress. Apart from a vaccine, I think the differences in outcome will be driven by things like other ways to supply oxygen or help patients in their gas exchange, says Schultz.

In the early days of the pandemic, physicians were alarmed by the rapid deterioration of some people with COVID-19, says Eddy Fan, an intensive-care physician at University Health Network in Toronto, Canada. There were a lot of unknowns about the best way to manage this, he says. Because the patient could deteriorate very quickly, the thought was to put them on a ventilator and breathing tube quickly to prevent deterioration.

But, in retrospect, clinicians might have been overzealous at times. Schultz recalls asking patients to get off of their mobile phones so he could put them on a ventilator, but a candidate for a ventilator normally wouldnt be well enough to hold a telephone conversation. As physicians became more comfortable treating people with COVID-19, many realized that early ventilation was not necessary, says Fan.

Unfortunately, the public began to become concerned that ventilators themselves were causing harm, says Summers. Now, she says, families are upset when physicians recommend that their loved ones be put on a ventilator even when there are no other suitable ways of providing oxygen. The narrative youve heard is that ventilators kill people, she says. Thats been particularly unhelpful. The NHS health-care centres with the lowest mortality rates during the pandemic used ventilators, but not too early. They followed standard protocols for when to use the devices, says Summers.

Ultimately, Summers and others attribute possible drops in death rates more to shoring up standard health-care practices than to medical advances. Its the little subtle things, says Angus.

This might mean that keeping death rates low could hinge on measures to reduce transmission. In Singapore, where COVID-19 death rates are among the lowest in the world, intensive-care physician Jason Phua at Alexandra Hospital says the key to the countrys success has been suppressing transmission, so that hospitals were never overwhelmed. Early reports of mortality from Wuhan approached 97% for people with COVID-19 who were on ventilators, he says. In Singapore, mortality rates in intensive-care units have been less than 15%. I dont think its because we are using the correct drugs, he says. I think whats happening is that the others are overwhelmed.

In response to the pandemic, many hospitals rapidly expanded their numbers of intensive-care beds, but that meant bringing in extra staff from other departments. Over time, those staff members have become more familiar with intensive care, learning to recognize the patterns that can signal when a patient is about to deteriorate. And hospitals have learnt to triage those who have risk factors for more severe disease, placing them under more careful observation.

Ultimately, reducing the COVID-19 death rate by 1020% would feel like a huge win in an intensive-care ward, says Levin. But that would still leave the number of deaths relatively high, particularly among older people, in whom the case-fatality rate approaches 30% for those more than 80 years old. Instead, he says, suppressing transmission is the best way to reduce COVID-19 deaths: In the grand scheme of things, from a public-policy angle, we need to say, Lets make sure that people in their 70s and 80s dont get infected.

President Biden Delivers Remarks at the Virtual Munich Security Conference

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from whitehouse’s YouTube Videos.

From: whitehouse
Duration: 00:00

The White House

AP Top Stories February 19 A posted at 10:20:29

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 AP Top Stories February 19 A

Here’s the latest for Friday February 19th: Senator Ted Cruz says Mexico trip was a mistake; Millions in Texas get power back; Weather disrupts COVID vaccination efforts; US to allow some asylum seekers to cross border from Mexico.

‘No Lockdown’-Sweden Sees COVID Deaths Plummet Quicker Than ‘Fully-Locked-Down’ UK posted at 11:10:03 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

‘No Lockdown’-Sweden Sees COVID Deaths Plummet Quicker Than ‘Fully-Locked-Down’ UK

‘No Lockdown’-Sweden Sees COVID Deaths Plummet Quicker Than ‘Fully-Locked-Down’ UK

Authored by Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

While the media in the UK is asserting lockdown measures caused COVID-19 deaths and cases to plummet, Sweden saw an even greater drop off in deaths despite enforcing comparatively minor restrictions.

This morning, UK broadcaster Sky News declared Lockdown is working! COVID-19 infection rate plummets in England.

One of the largest and most authoritative coronavirus surveys has found that infections are quickly falling in England, confirming that lockdown is working to suppress the virus, states the report.

The report claims that vaccines arent a factor in the reduction in deaths and cases because they are observed across all age groups.

However, as Dr. Eli David highlighted, COVID deaths in Sweden began dropping off even sooner without the need for harsh lockdown measures.

The strict lockdown in the UK was so effective that it stopped the spread of Covid in Sweden as well  pic.twitter.com/M12KVBibw5

Dr. Eli David (@DrEliDavid) February 17, 2021

The strict lockdown in the UK was so effective that it stopped the spread of Covid in Sweden as well, joked David.

In comparison to the UK, which imposed a full national lockdown in early January, Sweden refused to follow suit, only encouraging voluntary social distancing measures.

As we highlighted last October, health authorities in the Scandinavian country refused to follow the rest of Europe by imposing new coronavirus lockdown measures on their population, arguing that those beset by loneliness and misery of being isolated have suffered enough.

Despite all this, health authorities in Sweden are now considering a full lockdown for the first time due to what they say is a rise in cases over the last week.

The proposals would let the government close shopping centers, gyms and restaurants, as well as impose new restrictions on theme parks, zoos and museums. There will be a new system to control social gatherings and public events, reports Bloomberg.

*  *  *

New limited edition merch now available! Click here. In the age of mass Silicon Valley censorship It is crucial that we stay in touch. I need you to sign up for my free newsletter here. Support my sponsor  Turbo Force  a supercharged boost of clean energy without the comedown. Also, I urgently need your financial support here.

Tyler Durden Fri, 02/19/2021 – 06:10

IN THE PRESS Friday, 19.02.2021: French President Emmanuel #Macron has called on Western countries to urgently distribute Covid-19 #vaccines to developing nations. We discuss the politics at play behind the announcement. We also look at ransomware attacks targeting French hospitals and finish with a new initiative in the United States which aims to increase access to Ivy League schools for disadvantaged populations. 

Subscribe to France 24 now:
http://f24.my/youtubeEN

FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7
http://f24.my/YTliveEN

Visit our website:
http://www.france24.com

Subscribe to our YouTube channel:
http://f24.my/youtubeEN

Like us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English

Follow us on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/France24_en

French Health Minister Olivier Veran said at a news conference that it was too soon to ease up on #coronavirus containment measures and said that the isolation period for positive cases would be increased to 10 days from seven from Monday.

Pelosi predicts vote on Biden $1.9T rescue plan next week – New York Post posted at 09:05:03 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 Pelosi predicts vote on Biden $1.9T rescue plan next week – New York Post

Nancy-Pelosi-2.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&

  1. Pelosi predicts vote on Biden $1.9T rescue plan next week  New York Post
  2. House Democrats plan to push Biden’s Covid relief plan through the chamber next week  CNN
  3. New $1,400 stimulus checks could be coming. What we know about how soon they may arrive  CNBC
  4. How the minimum wage will hold workers back in the labor market | TheHill  The Hill
  5. Op-ed: An easy win for Biden don’t send stimulus checks to dead people  CNBC
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

“We must get to the truth of how this happened,” Pelosi said.

February 16, 2021, 5:59 AM

 6 min read

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced Monday that Congress will move to establish an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, similar to the one set up in the wake of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

“Now, as always, security is the order of the day: the security of our country, the security of our Capitol which is the temple of our democracy, and the security of our Members,” Pelosi said in a letter to her Democratic colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The events of Jan. 6 occurred after then-President Donald Trump and his allies held a rally earlier that day in Washington, D.C., urging Congress not to certify the results of the November presidential election, in which Trump lost to Democratic candidate Joe Biden. Trump vowed to “never concede” and urged his supporters “to fight,” as he continued to push baseless claims of election fraud.

Crowds of people then made their way to the Capitol steps, pushing through barricades, officers in riot gear and other security measures that were put in place in anticipation of the protest. An angry mob breached the Capitol building, forcing a lockdown with members of Congress and their staff holed up inside. It took hours for law enforcement to clear the building and establish a perimeter around the area. Five people, including a police officer, died during the rampage.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, with House impeachment managers, speaks to the press afte…Read MoreRead More

Retired Lt. Gen. Russel Honore was appointed to examine security on Capitol Hill following the insurrection. Meanwhile, the Senate acquitted Trump on Saturday in his second impeachment trial on a charge of inciting the Capitol rioters.

“For the past few weeks, General Honore has been assessing our security needs by reviewing what happened on January 6 and how we must ensure that it does not happen again,” Pelosi said in her letter. “He has been working with Committees of Jurisdiction and will continue to make proposals.”

“It is clear from his findings and from the impeachment trial that we must get to the truth of how this happened,” she continued. “To protect our security, our security, our security, our next step will be to establish an outside, independent 9/11-type Commission to ‘investigate and report on the facts and causes relating to the January 6, 2021 domestic terrorist attack upon the United States Capitol Complex and relating to the interference with the peaceful transfer of power, including facts and causes relating to the preparedness and response of the United States Capitol Police and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement in the National Capitol Region.'”

Supporters of President Donald Trump protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6, 2021.

The so-called 9/11 Commission was convened by congressional legislation that was signed into law by then-President George W. Bush in November 2002. After a 20-month-long investigation into the circumstances surrounding the terrorist attacks and how to prevent a similar attack, the bipartisan panel concluded in its final report that U.S. government intelligence agencies had failed to adequately assess the threat posed by al-Qaeda, among other things.

A growing number of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for a bipartisan, independent commission to investigate the Capitol siege. Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., who crossed party lines and voted alongside six other Republicans to convict Trump, told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Sunday on “This Week” that he supports a full investigation into the events of Jan. 6. In interviews following Cassidy, House impeachment manager Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pa., and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said they would support the creation of a 9/11 Commission-style independent inquiry into the Capitol siege.

In her letter, Pelosi said Congress must also allocate additional funding “to provide for the safety of Members and the security of the Capitol.”

“We will be forever grateful to the Capitol Police for their life-saving courage and heroism in securing the Capitol and protecting Members,” she said.

ABC News’ Katherine Faulders contributed to this report.

Audio Post – The Tip Of An Iceberg: Sexual Misconduct Within The FBI Is Exposed by AP! Investigate The Investigators who are nothing more and nothing less than a bunch of psychopaths, perverts, and child abusers. Abolish the FBI and put the criminal FBI agents in prison where they belong! The present crisis in America is the direct result of the FBI stupidity, treacherous incompetence and malfeasance.

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The FBI News Review.

The Tip Of An Iceberg: Sexual Misconduct Within The FBI Is Exposed by AP! Investigate The Investigators who are nothing more and nothing less than a bunch of psychopaths, perverts, and child abusers. Abolish the FBI and put the criminal FBI agents in prison where they belong! The present crisis in America is the direct result of the FBI stupiditytreacherous incompetence and malfeasance

The involvement of the “assistant director of the Insider Threat Office, a division at Washington headquarters tasked with rooting out leakers and safeguarding national security information” in theses issues is especially troubling and this might be an indication that this problem might be more significant and more complex and complicated than it appears to be at a first glance. 

Michael Novakhov

_________________________________

 
 
By JIM MUSTIAN
 
2 hours ago
A former FBI analyst, who asked to be identified only as Becky, poses for a photo, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020. Becky alleges in a new federal lawsuit that an FBI supervisory special agent licked her face and groped her at a colleagues farewell party in 2017. She ended up leaving the FBI and has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
WASHINGTON (AP) An assistant FBI director retired after he was accused of drunkenly groping a female subordinate in a stairwell. Another senior FBI official left after he was found to have sexually harassed eight employees. Yet another high-ranking FBI agent retired after he was accused of blackmailing a young employee into sexual encounters.
 
An Associated Press investigation has identified at least six sexual misconduct allegations involving senior FBI officials over the past five years, including two new claims brought this week by women who say they were sexually assaulted by ranking agents.
 
Each of the accused FBI officials appears to have avoided discipline, the AP found, and several were quietly transferred or retired, keeping their full pensions and benefits even when probes substantiated the sexual misconduct claims against them.
 
Beyond that, federal law enforcement officials are afforded anonymity even after the disciplinary process runs its course, allowing them to land on their feet in the private sector or even remain in law enforcement.
 
Theyre sweeping it under the rug, said a former FBI analyst who alleges in a new federal lawsuit that a supervisory special agent licked her face and groped her at a colleagues farewell party in 2017. She ended up leaving the FBI and has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.
 
As the premier law enforcement organization that the FBI holds itself out to be, its very disheartening when they allow people they know are criminals to retire and pursue careers in law enforcement-related fields, said the woman, who asked to be identified in this story only by her first name, Becky.
 
The APs count does not include the growing number of high-level FBI supervisors who have failed to report romantic relationships with subordinates in recent years a pattern that has alarmed investigators with the Office of Inspector General and raised questions about bureau policy.
 
The recurring sexual misconduct has drawn the attention of Congress and advocacy groups, which have called for whistleblower protections for rank-and-file FBI employees and for an outside entity to review the bureaus disciplinary cases.
 
They need a #MeToo moment, said U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, a California Democrat who has been critical of the treatment of women in the male-dominated FBI.
 
Its repugnant, and it underscores the fact that the FBI and many of our institutions are still good ol-boy networks, Speier said. It doesnt surprise me that, in terms of sexual assault and sexual harassment, they are still in the Dark Ages.
 
In a statement, the FBI said it maintains a zero-tolerance policy toward sexual harassment and that claims against supervisors have resulted in them being removed from their positions while cases are investigated and adjudicated.
 
It added that severe cases can result in criminal charges and that the FBIs internal disciplinary process assesses, among other factors, the credibility of the allegations, the severity of the conduct, and the rank and position of the individuals involved.
 
The AP review of court records, Office of Inspector General reports and interviews with federal law enforcement officials identified at least six allegations against senior officials, including an assistant director and special agents in charge of entire field offices, that ranged from unwanted touching and sexual advances to coercion.
 
None appears to have been disciplined, but another sexual misconduct allegation identified in the AP review of a rank-and-file agent resulted in him losing his security clearance.
 
The FBI, with more than 35,000 employees, keeps a notoriously tight lid on such allegations. The last time the Office of Inspector General did an extensive probe of sexual misconduct within the FBI, it tallied 343 offenses from fiscal years 2009 to 2012, including three instances of videotaping undressed women without consent.
 
The latest claims come months after a 17th woman joined a federal lawsuit alleging systemic sexual harassment at the FBIs training academy in Quantico, Virginia. That class-action case claims male FBI instructors made sexually charged comments about women needing to take their birth control to control their moods, inviting women trainees over to their homes and openly disparaging them.
 
In one of the new lawsuits filed Wednesday, a former FBI employee identified only as Jane Doe alleged a special agent in charge in 2016 retired without discipline and opened a law firm even after he imprisoned, tortured, harassed, blackmailed, stalked and manipulated her into having several non-consensual sexual encounters, including one in which he forced himself on her in a car. The AP is withholding the name and location of the accused special agent to protect the womans identity.
 
It is the policy and practice of the FBI and its OIG to allow senior executives accused of sexual assault to quietly retire with full benefits without prosecution, the womans attorney, David J. Shaffer, alleges in the lawsuit.
 
One such case involved Roger C. Stanton, who before his abrupt retirement served as assistant director of the Insider Threat Office, a division at Washington headquarters tasked with rooting out leakers and safeguarding national security information.
 
According to an Inspector Generals report concluded this year and obtained by AP through a public records request, Stanton was accused of drunkenly driving a female subordinate home following an after-work happy hour. The woman told investigators that once inside a stairwell of her apartment building, Stanton wrapped his arm around her waist and moved his hand down onto her bottom before she was able to get away and hustle up the stairs.
 
After Stanton left, he called the woman 15 times on her FBI phone and sent her what investigators described as garbled text complaining that he could not find his vehicle. The heavily redacted report does not say when the incident happened.
 
Stanton disputed the womans account and told investigators he did not intend to do anything and only placed his arm around her because of the narrowness of the stairs. But Stanton acknowledged he was very embarrassed by this event and assistant directors should not be putting themselves in these situations.
 
Stanton retired in late 2018 after the investigation determined he sexually harassed the woman and sought an improper relationship. He did not respond to requests for comment from AP.
 
Earlier this year, the Inspector General found that the special agent in charge of the Albany, New York, office, James N. Hendricks, sexually harassed eight subordinates at the FBI.
 
Hendricks also was not named in the OIG report despite its findings. He was first identified in September by the Albany Times Union. One current and one former colleague of Hendricks confirmed his role in the case to AP.
 
Hendricks now writes a law enforcement blog in which he touts his FBI accolades but makes no mention of the misconduct allegations. He did not respond to requests for comment.
 
Becky, the former analyst, told AP she once believed FBIs organizational values and mission aligned with how I was raised. But she was disabused of that notion after reporting to management that Charles Dick, a supervisory special agent at the FBI Training Academy at the time, sexually assaulted her at a farewell party.
 
Becky told AP her assailant had threatened her at least two times before. Once while we were waiting for the director he said, Im going to touch your ass. You know its going to happen.
 
His boorish behavior was well known, she added. He was getting away with everything.
 
In a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday, Becky accused the former agent of wrapping his arm around her chest while posing for a photograph and reaching under her and simulating penetration of her with his fingers through her jeans.
 
Dick denied the charges and was acquitted in state court in Virginia by a judge who ruled it wholly incredible that Becky would stand there and take it and not say anything, according to a transcript of the proceeding. Dick retired from the FBI months before the Inspector General followed up on Beckys internal complaint, Becky alleged in her lawsuit, adding she faced retaliation for coming forward.
 
Its much easier to suffer in isolation than it is to go public, she told AP. But if I dont report it, Im complicit in the cultural and institutionalized cover-up of this sort of behavior.
 
___
 
AP reporter Eric Tucker contributed to this report.
 
 

 Tweets 

  1.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    The Moscow Times

    @MoscowTimes

    A St. Petersburg man’s nose was bit off by a horse after he tried to make a pass at the woman riding it and then attempted to kiss the horse itself https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/12/10/horse-bites-off-st-petersburg-mans-nose-after-attempted-kiss-reports-a72307 

    Horse Bites Off St. Petersburg Mans Nose After Attempted Kiss Reports

    A lesson in consent.

    themoscowtimes.com

  2. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    The Tip Of An Iceberg: Sexual Misconduct Within The FBI By AP December 10, 2020 on #SoundCloud #np https://soundcloud.com/mike-nova-3/the-tip-of-an-iceberg-sexual-misconduct-within-the-fbi-by-ap-december-10-2020 

  3. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    The Tip Of An Iceberg: Sexual Misconduct Within The FBI Is Exposed by AP! Investigate The Investigators who are nothing more and nothing less than a bunch of psychopaths, perverts, and child abusers. Abolish the FBI! https://fbinewsreview.blogspot.com/2020/12/the-tip-of-iceberg-sexual-misconduct.html 

  4.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    Johnsons Russia List@JohnsonRussiaLi

    JRL NEWSWATCH: Protesters in Armenia besiege parliament, demand PM resigns AP/ Avet Demourian https://russialist.org/jrl-newswatch-protesters-in-armenia-besiege-parliament-demand-pm-resigns-ap-avet-demourian/ 

  5.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    Michael McFaul

    @McFaul

    The President of the United States of America is calling for a coup. Outrageous. (& that so many elected “leaders” in our country are remaining silent in response to this attack on our democracy is deeply disappointing.) https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1336695746029121537

  6. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    https://apnews.com/article/us-news-sexual-misconduct-a0d33e4770acef8ff5f4a48f0267202c 

    ‘Under the rug:’ Sexual misconduct shakes FBI’s senior ranks

    WASHINGTON (AP) An assistant FBI director retired after he was accused of drunkenly groping a female subordinate in a stairwell. Another senior FBI official left after he was found to have…

    apnews.com

  7. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    Infestation of rats the size of small cats forces closure of NYC Chipotle | Daily Mail Online https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9036025/Infestation-rats-size-small-cats-forces-closure-NYC-Chipotle.html?ito=social-twitter_dailymailus 

  8. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    Infestation of rats the size of cats forces closure of NYC Chipotle https://mol.im/a/9036025  via @MailOnline

    Infestation of rats the size of cats forces closure of NYC Chipotle

    The franchise, located in Manhattan, has been shuttered since last month after the rats reportedly chewed through wiring of a computer system that took customer orders.

    dailymail.co.uk

  9.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    Daily Mail US

    @DailyMail

    Giant rats force closure of Manhattan Chipotle https://trib.al/WLu2aKL 

    Infestation of rats the size of cats forces closure of NYC Chipotle

    The franchise, located in Manhattan, has been shuttered since last month after the rats reportedly chewed through wiring of a computer system that took customer orders.

    dailymail.co.uk

  10.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    Military History Now@MilHistNow

    On this day in 1942, the Polish government-in-exile reveals to the international community shocking details about the mass extermination of Jews by the Nazis. The Raczyński’s Note represents the first official report of the Holocaust.

  11.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    New York Post Metro

    @nypmetro

    Northern Lights may be seen in New York this week https://trib.al/biinelm 

  12.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

    The Daily Beast

    @thedailybeast

    There have been over 40 COVID-19 cases in Donald Trumps circle, so Joe Biden’s team plans to thoroughly clean and disinfect all the surfaces in the White House before moving in. https://trib.al/gS2zV2f 

    Biden Will Disinfect the White House After Trump Moves Out

    President-elect Biden has announced parts of his COVID safety plan for the country, but what does his safety plan for the White House look like?

    thedailybeast.com

  13.  Michael Novakhov Retweeted

Biden: White supremacists are the most dangerous people in America posted at 13:02:32 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Biden: White supremacists are the most dangerous people in America

Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple posted at 22:25:31 UTC – SharedNewsLinks Review thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/bidens

Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple posted at 22:25:31 UTC – SharedNewsLinks Review thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/bidensEuivz83XMAA9ku3.png:large

New York’s Washington Square Park Turns Into Winter Wonderland posted at 19:46:33 UTC thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/new-yoEuiP-IVXYAQuMSd.png:large

NATO aircraft intercepted & driven out by Russian jets posted at 16:29:22 UTC thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/nato-aEuhiAOoXYAUs0Gh.jpg:large

US, UK, and European military – Google Search google.com/search?q=US%2C

US, UK, and European military – Google Search google.com/search?q=US%2CEuhXplEWQAUowCk.jpg:large

EU army warning: US and UK at risk from European military – MEP lifts lid on Macron’s plot – Daily Express posted at 15:18:39 UTC thenewsandtimes.blogspot.com/2021/02/eu-armEuhXJGJXAAcNuZl.png:large

Michael Novakhov retweeted:
Bill Gates says Texas governor was wrong to blame blackouts on frozen wind turbines trib.al/Mvap5Iu
US, UK, and European military – Google Search google.com/search?q=US%2C express.co.uk/news/politics/

Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader inoreader.com/stream/user/10 express.co.uk/news/politics/

picture Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

WASHINGTON Two weeks after President Bidens inauguration, Frances president, Emmanuel Macron, spoke publicly about the importance of dialogue with Moscow, saying that Russia is a part of Europe that cannot simply be shunned and that Europe must be strong enough to defend its own interests.

On Dec. 30, just weeks before the inauguration, the European Union clinched an important investment agreement with China, days after a tweet by Mr. Bidens national security adviser, Jake Sullivan, asking for early consultations with Europe on China and seeming to caution against a quick deal.

Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple posted at 22:25:31 UTC – SharedNewsLinks Review

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple

1000282.jpg

picture Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

WASHINGTON Two weeks after President Bidens inauguration, Frances president, Emmanuel Macron, spoke publicly about the importance of dialogue with Moscow, saying that Russia is a part of Europe that cannot simply be shunned and that Europe must be strong enough to defend its own interests.

Bidens Plan to Link Arms With Europe Against Russia and China Isnt So Simple

Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

WASHINGTON Two weeks after President Bidens inauguration, Frances president, Emmanuel Macron, spoke publicly about the importance of dialogue with Moscow, saying that Russia is a part of Europe that cannot simply be shunned and that Europe must be strong enough to defend its own interests.

On Dec. 30, just weeks before the inauguration, the European Union clinched an important investment agreement with China, days after a tweet by Mr. Bidens national security adviser, Jake Sullivan, asking for early consultations with Europe on China and seeming to caution against a quick deal.

So even as the United States resets under new White House leadership, Europe is charting its own course on Russia and China in ways that do not necessarily align with Mr. Bidens goals, posing a challenge as the new American president sets out to rebuild a post-Trump alliance with the Continent.

On Friday, Mr. Biden will address the Munich Security Conference, a gathering of leaders and diplomats from Europe and the United States that he has attended for decades and that helped cement his reputation as a champion of trans-Atlantic solidarity.

Speaking at the conference two years ago, Mr. Biden lamented the damage the Trump administration had inflicted on the once-sturdy postwar relationship between Washington and Europes major capitals. This too shall pass, Mr. Biden said. We will be back. He promised that the United States would again shoulder our responsibility of leadership.

The presidents remarks on Friday are sure to repeat that promise and spotlight his now-familiar call for a more unified Western front against the anti-democratic threats posed by Russia and China. In many ways, such talk is sure to be received like a warm massage by European leaders tensed and shellshocked by four years of President Donald J. Trumps mercurial and often contemptuous diplomacy.

But if by leadership Mr. Biden means a return to the traditional American assumption we decide and you follow many Europeans feel that that world is gone, and that Europe must not behave like Americas junior wingman in fights defined by Washington.

Demonstrated by the European Unions trade deal with China, and conciliatory talk about Moscow from leaders like Mr. Macron and Germanys likely next chancellor, Armin Laschet, Europe has its own set of interests and ideas about how to manage the United States two main rivals, ones that will complicate Mr. Bidens diplomacy.

Biden is signaling an incredibly hawkish approach to Russia, lumping it in with China, and defining a new global Cold War against authoritarianism, said Jeremy Shapiro, the research director at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

That makes many European leaders nervous, he said. And other regional experts said they had seen fewer signs of overt enthusiasm from the Continent than Biden administration officials might have hoped for.

There was always a cleareyed recognition that we werent just going to be able to show up and say, Hey guys, were back! said Andrea Kendall-Taylor, who was in line to become the National Security Council director for Russia but who did not take the job for personal reasons.

But even with all of that, I think there was optimism that it would be easier than it looks like its going to be, said Ms. Kendall-Taylor, the director of the Transatlantic Security Program at the Center for a New American Security.

Ulrich Speck, a senior visiting fellow at the German Marshall Fund in Berlin, added: After the freeze in relations under Trump, I expected more warming. I dont see it yet.

Mr. Biden quickly took many of the easiest steps toward reconciliation and unity with Europe, including rejoining the Paris climate agreement, renewing an emphasis on multilateralism and human rights, and vowing to rejoin the disintegrating 2015 Iran nuclear deal.

But aligning against Russia and China will be much more difficult.

China may be a peer rival for the United States, but it has long been a vital trade partner for Europe. And while European leaders see Beijing as a systemic rival and competitor, they also see it as a partner, and hardly view it as an enemy.

And Russia remains a nuclear-armed neighbor, however truculent, and has financial and emotional leverage of its own.

Since Mr. Biden was last in the White House, as vice president during the Obama administration, Britain, historically the United States most reliable diplomatic partner, has left the European Union and now coordinates foreign policy less effectively with its continental allies.

That sophisticated British view of the world is absent, said Nicholas Burns, a former under secretary of state and ambassador to NATO in the George W. Bush administration. I dont think the U.S. is intertwined yet with Europe, diplomatically and strategically, he added.

This weeks security conference is not run by the German government, but Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany will address it, along with Mr. Biden, Mr. Macron and Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain. And Germany itself illustrates some of the problems the Biden administration will face in its effort to lock arms against Moscow.

Ms. Merkels ruling Christian Democratic Party has chosen Mr. Laschet as its leader, and he is its likely candidate to succeed her in autumn elections. But Mr. Laschet is more sympathetic than Mr. Biden to both Russia and China. He has cast doubt on the extent of Russian political disinformation and hacking operations and publicly criticized marketable anti-Putin populism. He has also been a strong supporter of Germanys export-led economy, which is deeply reliant on China.

Germany still intends to put into operation the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, a 746-mile natural gas artery that runs under the Baltic Sea from northern Russia to Germany. The paired pipelines are owned by Gazprom, itself owned by Russia. Work stopped on the project last year with 94 percent of the pipes laid after the U.S. Congress imposed further sanctions on the project on the grounds that it helped fund the Kremlin, damaged Ukraine and gave Russia the potential to manipulate Europes energy supply.

Last year, German politicians responded to threats of economic punishment made by Republican American senators by claiming blackmail, economic war and neo-imperialism. Many want to complete the pipeline project, but on Tuesday, the White House press secretary, Jen Psaki, told reporters that Mr. Biden opposed it as a bad deal that divided Europe and made it more vulnerable to Russian treachery.

Despite the sanctions, Russian ships have renewed laying pipes, and Ms. Merkel defends the project as a business venture, not a geopolitical statement. The Germans argue that European Union energy regulations and new pipeline configurations reduce Russian ability to manipulate supplies and that Russia is more dependent on the income than Europe is on the gas.

There are signs that, as with the China deal, the Biden administration wants to move on and negotiate a solution with Germany, to remove a major irritant with a crucial ally. That could include, some suggest, snapback sanctions if Moscow diverts supplies or halts transit fees to Ukraine.

In France, Mr. Macron has long sought to develop a more positive dialogue with Mr. Putin, but his efforts for a reset have gone nowhere. The European Unions foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell Fontelles, tried something similar this month with embarrassing results when Foreign Minister Sergey V. Lavrov of Russia humiliated him at a news conference and called the European Union an unreliable partner.

Together with the attempted assassination and then the jailing of the Russian opposition leader Aleksei A. Navalny, the treatment of Mr. Borrell means that Brussels is likely to place new sanctions on Russia, but not before the end of March, and will be more open to Mr. Bidens suggestions for a tougher line.

Biden administration officials say that coordinating with a fractious Europe has never been easy and that its leaders welcome restored American leadership especially on a Chinese threat more apparent to Europe than it was five years ago.

As for China and the investment agreement, after seven years of difficult talks, European officials have defended it as largely an effort to obtain the same access to the Chinese market for their companies that American firms had received through Mr. Trumps China deal last year.

There is no reason for us to suffer from an unlevel playing field, including vis-à-vis the U.S., Sabine Weyand, the E.U. director general for trade, said in a virtual forum in early February. Why should we sit still?

Ms. Weyand said the deal set high standards for Chinese trade practices, which would ultimately put the United States and Europe in a stronger position to have a more assertive policy together on China.

The deal must be ratified by the European Parliament, however, which has been critical of its failure to guarantee more labor rights, and it is unlikely to come to a vote until much later this year. And, again, Biden administration officials seem to be willing to move on, given the importance of cooperation with Europe on China.

The deal potentially could complicate trans-Atlantic cooperation on China, said Wendy Cutler, a former U.S. trade negotiator and a vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute, but I dont think its going to preclude it.

Michael Crowley reported from Washington, and Steven Erlanger from Brussels. Ana Swanson contributed reporting from Washington.

New York’s Washington Square Park Turns Into Winter Wonderland posted at 19:46:33 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 New York’s Washington Square Park Turns Into Winter Wonderland

Washington Square Park in New York looks like a winter wonderland as the city expects up to 25 centimeters of snow.

Snow fell steadily across New York City throughout the morning, forcing the cancelation of hundreds of flights and delaying the opening of two COVID-19 vaccination sites after the storm disrupted dosage delivery.

NATO aircraft intercepted & driven out by Russian jets posted at 16:29:22 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 NATO aircraft intercepted & driven out by Russian jets

Follow us on Telegram https://t.me/rtintl / https://t.me/rtvisual

Two French fighter jets and a tanker aircraft have been escorted away from Russias airspace by two Su-27 interceptor planes, Russian Defense Ministry footage shows.

In a statement, the National Defense Control Center (NDCC) said the Southern Military District deployed the interceptors on Wednesday morning after radar spotted the French trio over the Black Sea.

The targets were identified as a group of French Air Force planes that consisted of a KC-135 aerial refueling tanker and two Mirage 2000 tactical aircraft, the NDCC said.

After the French aircraft U-turned away from Russian airspace, the Russian fighters returned to base. Their flight was in strict compliance with the international rules of using the airspace, the NDCC added.

Wednesday’s interception comes amid increased NATO activity in the Black Sea at the behest of Ukraine, which has recently urged the US-led alliance to increase air operations near Crimea, which seceded from Ukraine and joined Russia after a 2014 referendum.

The Russian Defense Ministry detected an estimated 2,900 combat aircraft and 1,100 spy planes approaching Russian airspace in 2020 alone.

U.S. Capitol Police officials told congressional leaders the razor-wire topped fencing around the Capitol should remain in place for several more …

cnn_topstories?d=yIl2AUoC8zA cnn_topstories?d=7Q72WNTAKBA cnn_topstories?i=HBg3jAmwCxQ:9xrLfSlWZjI cnn_topstories?d=qj6IDK7rITs cnn_topstories?i=HBg3jAmwCxQ:9xrLfSlWZjI

Joni is one of the most recognized teachers and Vedic astrologers in the world. She was a faculty member for ACVA, CVA and instructor for online certification programs, published many books, and appeared on national and international television shows. As the keynote speaker for international conferences, she has a Japanese website, and teaches in Austria,Continue reading “Whos Who in Earth Intelligence: Joni Patry”

Putin, Erdogan discuss possible deliveries of Russian vaccines to Turkey  TASS

New York Weather: Snow To Intensify This Afternoon

CBS2’s Elise Finch has the latest weather forecast.

Mayor De Blasio Holds Daily Briefing

Mayor Bill de Blasio holds briefing as snow begins to blanket New York City.

picture
Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from 7952065.png The News And Times.

EU army warning: US and UK at risk from European military – MEP lifts lid on Macron’s plot – Daily Express posted at 15:18:39 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

What is Facebook without news? People and publishers in Australia are now finding out.
Facebook (FB) has barred Australians from finding or sharing news on its service, a dramatic escalation of a fight with the government that may have wide-ranging consequences both in the country and around the world.
The social networking company on Wednesday said that people and publishers in Australia will no longer be able to share or see any news from local or international outlets. The decision appears to be the most restrictive move Facebook has ever taken against content publishers.
The company’s action comes after months of tension with the Australian government, which has proposed legislation that would force tech platforms to pay news publishers for content. CNN’s Brian Stelter reports.
#BrianStelter #FirstMove #CNNBusiness

One in THREE US military service members refuse COVID-19 vaccine – Daily Mail posted at 14:11:12 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

One in THREE US military service members refuse COVID-19 vaccine – Daily Mail  posted at 14:11:12 UTC

One in THREE US military service members refuse COVID-19 vaccine – Daily Mail

39425420-0-image-a-2_1613608298422.jpg

One in THREE US military service members refuse COVID-19 vaccine  Daily Mail

Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader
The superspreaders behind top COVID-19 conspiracy theories  ABC News

ea71aa4a-93ba-4a46-a169-bee863e407c1-Bid

  1. White House unveils Biden’s immigration bill, including an eight-year path to citizenship  USA TODAY
  2. White House announces sweeping immigration bill  CNN
  3. Recipe for disaster: Dem fears mount over immigration overhaul  POLITICO
  4. Op-Ed: Think of Biden’s immigration plan as a statute of limitations on crossing the border illegally  Los Angeles Times
  5. Biden’s dangerous border policy | TheHill  The Hill
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

Generic-Power-Lines-5.jpg?resize=1200%2C

  1. Rolling Power Cuts Coming to an End, Oncor Says, But Outages Continue Due to Damage  NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
  2. Texas’ Underregulated Energy Grid Responsible For Millions Without Heat, Electricity | NBC News NOW  NBC News
  3. AOC rips Texas governor for blaming storm outages on Green New Deal  Business Insider
  4. Texas Republicans lied about the power crisis. We need more investment in renewables not less.  The Washington Post
  5. Letters to the Editor Readers share their complaints about the failure of Texas power grid to handle  The Dallas Morning News
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News
‘Worrying’ new coronavirus variant detected in UK  Arab News

CONEY ISLAND, Brooklyn (WABC) — A Brooklyn woman is under arrest after allegedly throwing her newborn baby into the trash, resulting in the …
9:02 AM 2/18/2021 – McConnell’s plan to deal with Donald Trump: Ignore him

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

9:02 AM 2/18/2021 – McConnell’s plan to deal with Donald Trump: Ignore him

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s plan to deal with Donald Trump: Ignore him cnn.it/37sIWMO pic.twitter.com/mHWV6CcHHr


EugXE1SXIAAvZoX.png


Retweeted by JKTgtWyf_normal.jpg Michael Novakhov (mikenov) on Thursday, February 18th, 2021 12:07pm

mikenov on Twitter: PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 17, 2021 youtu.be/sTfHKAle5I0 via @YouTube

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 17, 2021 youtu.be/sTfHKAle5I0 via @YouTube


6455151 mikenov on Twitter

Grand jury upgrades charges for man seen chasing officer Eugene Goodman hill.cm/zpWYulv pic.twitter.com/Ug4W1BZPDN


EugbqI4WQAEcU56.png


Retweeted by JKTgtWyf_normal.jpg Michael Novakhov (mikenov) on Thursday, February 18th, 2021 12:09pm

234 likes, 43 retweets

6455151 mikenov on Twitter

CNN says it reinstated a ban on Chris Cuomo covering his brother, Gov. Cuomo trib.al/QI2qo3e pic.twitter.com/6mu18yzNLP


EugUjqoWQAA3GAw.jpg


Retweeted by JKTgtWyf_normal.jpg Michael Novakhov (mikenov) on Thursday, February 18th, 2021 12:09pm

429 likes, 105 retweets

6455151 mikenov on Twitter

Military not “yet” requiring mandatory COVID vaccine, even among those headed for deployment newsweek.com/military-not-y

AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: Allison Janney is an ‘invisible woman’ in new dramedy posted at 10:45:49 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

 AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: Allison Janney is an ‘invisible woman’ in new dramedy  posted at 10:45:49 UTC

AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: Allison Janney is an ‘invisible woman’ in new dramedy

From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 01:27

Allison Janney talks about playing an underappreciated woman in “Breaking News in Yuba County,” while co-star Juliette Lewis reveals who inspired her performance. (Feb. 18)

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/825a4c03a4824b0e80c26692410bfa5d

maxresdefault.jpg

2236140 AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos

From: AlJazeeraEnglish
Duration: 02:00

An icy blast continues to cripple parts of the US where more than 20 people have been killed amid the freezing conditions in the south.
The once-in-a-generation storm has left millions without power and three-quarters of the country blanketed in snow.
Storm warnings have been issued for the states of Oklahoma, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas and Arkansas, disrupting COVID-19 vaccination programmes there.

Al Jazeeras Andy Gallacher reports.

– Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

#TexasWinterStorm2021 #TexasBlackout #TexasFreeze

maxresdefault.jpg

568507 AlJazeeraEnglish’s YouTube Videos

AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: AP Top Stories February 18 A

From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 00:55

Here’s the latest for Thursday February 18th: Anger grows as Texas deals with blackouts and cold; Thousands in dark for days in Portland, Oregon; Biden Administration plans to boost COVID testing supplies; Italy’s Mount Etna volcano erupts.

Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress
Website: https://apnews.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP
Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews
Google+: https://plus.google.com/115892241801867723374
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/

maxresdefault.jpg

2236140 AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos

Podcasts Review – Latest episodes – 5:32 AM 2/18/2021

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Podcasts Review – Latest episodes – 5:32 AM 2/18/2021

KBS WORLD Radio News
KBS WORLD Radio News
-99 mins ago
News(Top News : The U.S. Department of Justice indicts three North Korean hackers for attempted cyberattacks to steal one-point-three billion U.S. dollars in crypto and traditional currencies.) – 2021.02.18 PM5
Last updated : 2021.02.18 The latest news from home and abroad, with a close eye on Northeast Asia and the Korean Peninsula in particular

Play

VOA NEWS
VOA News
1 min ago
VOA – 20210218

Play

VOA NEWS
VOA News
1 min ago
VOA – 20210217

Play

BBC NEWS
BBC News
3 mins ago
BBC – 20210218

Play

BBC NEWS
BBC News
3 mins ago
BBC – 20210217

Play

Reuters Now 5-minute briefing(audiosafe-stream-us)
Reuters Now 5-minute briefing(audiosafe-stream-us)
3 mins ago
Reuters Now 5-minute briefing(audiosafe-stream-us)
Updated around the clock, Reuters TV taps into a network of 2,500 journalists reporting from 200 locations worldwide. Straight from the source and made to fit your day.

5 min

BBC News
BBC News
13 mins ago
BBC News 10:00 GMT
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.

Play

USA Radio News
USA Radio News
15 mins ago
USA Radio News 021821 Hour 05

4 min

Audio Stories from The Associated Press
Audio Stories from The Associated Press
20 mins ago
Crippling weather hampers vaccine deliveries, distribution

2 min left

Audio Stories from The Associated Press
Audio Stories from The Associated Press
20 mins ago
Lawmakers to face off with GameStop saga’s key players

2 min

The Untold Story with Martha MacCallum
The Untold Story with Martha MacCallum
21 mins ago
The Push To Hold Governor Cuomo Accountable
This week, Martha is joined by State Assemblyman Ron Kim, FOX News Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean and concerned daughter Joanne Miles to share how their lives were impacted by the spread of COVID-19 in New York nursing homes. They explain the truths that are being uncovered about what state officials knew about the death rates and their hopes to hold Governor Cuomo accountable for how his policies contributed to  the spread of COVID-19 in nursing facilities. Follow Martha on Twitter: @MarthaMacCallum

17 min

NPR News Now
NPR News Now
21 mins ago
NPR News: 02-18-2021 5AM ET
NPR News: 02-18-2021 5AM ET

39 sec left

Facebook sends blunt message to the world, blocking Australians’ access to news | ABC News posted at 09:35:20 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Facebook sends blunt message to the world, blocking Australians’ access to news | ABC News posted at 09:35:20 UTC

maxresdefault.jpg

Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader
Петербург пережил аномально морозную ночь

zima.jpg

396889 Российская Газета

6776987 1. Russian Press from Michael_Novakhov (80 sites)

Экс-министр иностранных дел ФРГ Зигмар Габриэль считает, что после разоблачения коррупции Навальным люди Путина должны были уйти в отставку, а решение о “Северном потоке-2” должно приниматься в Европе, а не в Америке.

123329 Inopressa

5184.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=8

The bright future of younger generations is being perpetually postponed by ageing authoritarian politicians

  • Nelson Chamisa is leader of the MDC Alliance, Zimbabwes largest opposition party

Africa cannot afford to continue with the despotic forms of governance that still proliferate across the continent. Authoritarian and dictatorial governments are repressive, corrupt and inefficient. Their main interest is to retain power and loot public resources for the benefit of a few political elites, leaving the majority of citizens in poverty. As a result, although rich in raw resources, our continent remains the poorest in the world.

We have seen this trend of authoritarianism in Zimbabwe, and we are now seeing it in Uganda, which has just held a farcical election.

Continue reading…

From: NewsOnABC
Duration: 05:59

Facebook has sent a blunt message to the world – any attempt to force it to pay for news content will mean an end to those feeds.
Missing our news on Facebook? Go straight to the source — download the ABC News app here: https://www.abc.net.au/app/
Subscribe: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Read more here: https://ab.co/3pqn9ve

Australia woke up today to find most local news pages were just a blank space.
But caught up as collateral damage were many other posts, from charities, critical health sites and emergency services.
The stunning move has ignited a wave of fury.

Trump has a lot of money problems | FBI Reform posted at 09:16:34 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Trump has a lot of money problems | FBI Reform posted at 09:16:34 UTC

 
Michael Novakhov’s favorite articles on Inoreader: Trump has a lot of money problems. Post author By admin; Post date February 17 …

New customers can sign-up for 6-months of Apple News+ for FREE ($60 value)  9to5Toys

Hush, little lamb. You can own The Silence of the Lambs in 4K for $8  CNET

MWC insists on holding potential COVID-19 superspreader event in Barcelona  The Verge

Amazon says it wants to help Biden reach 100M vaccination goal  CNET

NPR News: 02-18-2021 4AM ET

How colonial systems have left some First Nations without drinking water  Global News
Risky Encounters with Russia: Time to Talk About Real Deconfliction

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from War on the Rocks.

The days of the United States rolling over in the face of Russias aggressive actions are over, said President Joe Biden on Feb. 4, in his initial foreign policy speech. This coupled with the first actions his defense and foreign policy team have taken confirms speculation about the new administration taking a tougher stance vis-à-vis Russia. Yet, Biden also made it clear that, although not so widely reported, the United States is willing to deal with the Kremlin on critical national security matters, such as the agreement to extend the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START).

In that spirit, there is one other issue with Moscow that requires immediate attention and is worth the effort to cooperate on: the growing number close contacts between U.S. and NATO air, land, and naval forces and their counterparts on the Russian side. Any of these encounters implies a threat of rapid escalation should something go terribly wrong, like a mid-air collision, a prospect made more likely owing to reckless conduct by the Russians during some of these incidents.

Deconfliction which is not really as simple as a hotline between Russian and NATO commanders, but rather involves advanced coordination of military activities could offer one solution, but admittedly the status quo is complicated. This critical matter is set against a fraught backdrop of increasingly more widespread attacks by the Russian intelligence services to penetrate and exploit U.S. computer networks (including some in the Department of Defense and intelligence agencies); the more bellicose geopolitical narrative between Moscow and Washington; Russian military forays in the Middle East and Africa, and the endless war the Kremlin perpetuates in eastern Ukraine; Moscows persistent propagation of disinformation intended to destabilize American politics and society; and the recent arrest and imprisonment of Russian dissident Alexey Navalny. But, even in this context, if the United States seeks to reduce the likelihood of a serious military crisis, an initiative to regularize military operational activity on the part of NATO and Russia might provide the basis for a broader reduction in tensions.

Two questions arise when considering this important political-military problem. Why are these events occurring more frequently and more widely now, and what can be done to mitigate the dangers inherent in such encounters? As the vast majority of these incidents occur in the air, the emphasis here will be on that sphere of operations, but the overall principles and correctives to the fundamental problem certainly apply to sea and land operations as well.

We Have to Stop Meeting Like This

States that can will use highly visible deployments of aircraft, naval vessels, and ground forces to demonstrate what Michael Kofman has termed status projection. These show of force missions or assurance measures serve, as do military exercises, as geopolitical messaging to opponents. Such interactions are part and parcel of a multi-layered, multi-faceted thick geopolitics (as articulated by Gerard Toal) and should therefore be seen as implying much more than military capability.

Recent U.S. B-52 missions to the Persian Gulf region intended to send a message of deterrence to Iran, or U.S. Navy freedom-of-navigation transits of the South China Sea to counter Chinas de facto occupation of islands there, exemplify such activities. Likewise, the Indian navys higher operational tempo and increasing cooperation with the United States and other navies in the Indian Ocean and beyond is intended as a counter to Chinas own expanding presence in the region. The messages that such actions convey can have very significant strategic and operational implications, perhaps even beyond the immediate intended effect. For example, Russias dramatic simulated nuclear strike on Stockholm in 2013 contributed to that historically neutral Nordic countrys much closer integration with NATO.

As dramatic as these geopolitical demonstrations are, by far the most common, and deceptively mundane, way that Western and Russian forces meet is in air-to-air intercepts. These events, which number in the hundreds yearly, occur when radar monitoring reveals aircraft that are not identifiable, and fighters are dispatched to visually identify potential intruders, including foreign military aircraft that have not filed flight plans or do not have an active signature transponder. Even though they may be routine, they hold the potential for trouble, especially if they happen during times of high tension. Repeated violations, such as those by the Russian Air Force in Swedish and Danish airspace, also have geopolitical messaging consequences, alienating the recipient and embellishing Russias miscreant reputation.

Add ubiquitous intelligence collection flights by many nations through areas of operational interest and the ante goes up even further. In addition to routine electronic monitoring missions (including large numbers by the United States and Russia), on occasion, simulated attack profiles are flown to observe defensive responses. Conveying the message and gathering the data connotes danger and increases the likelihood that opposing forces will meet each other in a potentially lethal manner. One such scenario involving groups of Russian and Chinese bombers that approached South Korean airspace resulted in South Korean fighters firing hundreds of warning shots at a Russian airborne early warning aircraft. Such responses can go awry, as happened when a Chinese fighter collided with a U.S. Navy EP-3 off Hainan Island in 2001, resulting in a diplomatic crisis.

The Road Taken Might Have Been a Wrong Turn

Dangerously close encounters between U.S. and NATO militaries and the Russian armed services occur more frequently now and, accordingly, feature more prominently in print, online, and broadcast media on both sides of the divide. As Ian Kearns discussed in 2015, these incidents also imply more operational risk and serious knock-on effects. The increasing number and varied types of missions we see today, as compared with 2015, are a predictable byproduct of the new strategic competition between contemporary Russia and the West that, following the disintegration of the Soviet Union, has radically altered the Eurasian geopolitical and military landscape and has expanded into new conflict areas.

Thus, these events now occur regularly right around the Eurasian landmass, literally from the North Cape of Norway moving counter-clockwise to the Bering Sea, and extend into the Middle East and North Africa. Within the past year, Russian fighters have repeatedly intercepted U.S. Navy patrol aircraft over the eastern Mediterranean Sea and have had close encounters with U.S. Air Force aircraft in the Syria-Iraq war zone. There have also been serious clashes between U.S. ground forces and Russian private military contractors in that conflict. And Russian warships recently forced American fishing boats from their grounds off Alaska.

But nowhere does this eyeball-to-eyeball confrontation manifest more intensely and dramatically than in the immediate contact zone in Europe between NATO member states and Russia, especially in the Baltic and Black Sea regions. As has been widely discussed in this forum, the eastward expansion of NATO from 1999 to 2004 which incorporated new member states neighboring, or close to Russia placed the alliance in a position where the countries that sought admission would then need to be assured by NATOs bolstering defenses in the east if Russia presented a more threatening posture.

That rationale became stronger when Russia prompted at least in part by NATOs moves made new ambitious military enhancements and adopted a more aggressive foreign and defense policy, including attacks on neighboring non-NATO countries Georgia and Ukraine. Russias actions, especially after its invasion of eastern Ukraine and annexation of Crimea in 2014, then induced the alliance to redouble its efforts to reassure its most vulnerable members (particularly the Baltic states and Poland) and deter Russian aggression despite concerns over placing forces (especially air assets) within easy range of Russian offensive weaponry. Predictably, this led to Russia bolstering its forces in its Western and Southern Military Districts (adjoining the Baltic and Black sea regions, respectively), especially in its Kaliningrad exclave and in Crimea.

Meet the Russians

How does this changing geopolitical landscape influence events at the operational level? First, when NATOs territorial remit was extended further along the southern and eastern littoral of the Baltic, the alliance quickly introduced a military presence in those countries. Whether or not that decision made good sense has been called into question. Those questions aside, NATO established the Baltic Air Policing mission in 2004 in Lithuania and in 2014 in Estonia with quick reaction alert fighters drawn rotationally from NATO air forces to provide airspace security for the three NATO Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania), which have no combat aircraft of their own. NATO makes clear that these alert fighters are, in the first instance, launched to visually identify Russian Federation Air Force aircraft.

But the regional geography that requires Russian air and naval craft to navigate around the Baltic NATO members while transiting to and from Kaliningrad combines with NATOs upgraded air surveillance and intercept capabilities to guarantee a high number of contacts and a greater risk. To illustrate the seriousness involved, in 2017, NATO jets intercepted a Russian transport carrying Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu to Kaliningrad in what would have been a routine encounter involving fighters approaching within a safe distance from the suspect aircraft to visually identify it. But missile-armed Russian fighters accompanying Shoigus aircraft intervened, elevating the situation to a higher risk of hostile action that then made headlines because of the high-profile passenger. But such occurrences are now regular events over the Baltic. NATO recently reported that, in 2020, it performed around 350 intercepts of Russian aircraft in the region.

U.S. and NATO naval activities on and near the Baltic Sea have also ramped up, with the U.S. Second Fleets new command oversight emblematic of the heightened operational and exercise tempo in the region. As NATOs naval presence in the region expands, this places more allied ships in the confined and busy limits of the Baltic and thus at closer quarters with the Russian Navys Baltic Fleet. With U.S. Navy destroyers now operating routinely in the Baltic along with the British Royal Navy, their Russian counterparts respond and shadow. On occasion, Russian aircraft have made unsafe low-level passes over U.S. warships that, owing to the provocative nature of the maneuvers, are seen as emphatic gestures of Moscows disapproval.

The same kind of friction also now manifests in southeastern Europe and in the Black Sea area. Consequently, NATOs defensive posture in the region is much the same as in the Baltic, with air policing and a larger naval presence gaining traction. And, again, regional geography shapes the manner in which Russia and NATO interact: that is, both sides border the sea, with Russia possessing a major military complex in its midst. This renders the Black Sea another area where red is destined to meet blue, the only issue being under what circumstances. In response to Russias belligerent acts in Ukraine and heightened military capability and activity in the region, the alliance has, among other moves, expanded its air policing mission to southeastern Europe. From air bases in Romania and Bulgaria, intercepts of Russian aircraft are taking place, and, based on experience, will likely increase.

The Black Sea itself is likewise an arena in which Russian and U.S. and NATO forces operate in close proximity. In recent years, the U.S. Navy and other NATO vessels have ventured into these strategically vital waters to, in the words of the U.S. Navy, strengthen interoperability with NATO allies and partners and demonstrate collective resolve to Black Sea security. In 2020, U.S. Navy ships made seven transits into the Black Sea to communicate that commitment. Russia, not surprisingly, reacts strongly to these and other missions, again shadowing; at times, harassing U.S. warships by buzzing them; and conducting snap drills whenever the United States and/or NATO conducts training exercises with regional navies.

Unsafe at Any Speed

Numerous photos and videos show that, while maneuvering near U.S. aircraft and warships, Russian fighters and naval vessels at times exhibit unprofessional and highly dangerous conduct in contravention of international air and maritime safety norms hardly a good basis for risk avoidance. Senior U.S. and NATO commanders have complained publicly about such incidents, to no avail. Russian Ministry of Defense officials, for their part, deny that any of these maneuvers have been unsafe. Moscows vaunted disinformation apparatus unabashedly rejects proof and attempts to shift the blame to others, as it has on other occasions, such as the shootdown of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. It might also be the case that official subterfuge is intended to refocus attention on the intruders and, at times, it is successful.

Indeed, as Andrew S. Weiss and Nicole Ng maintain:

[The Russian] government intentionally exploits the threat of military accidents as a political tool and source of leverage [and] sees these asymmetrical tactics as a valuable tool for pushing adversaries away from strategically important areas and testing whether the West can be intimidated.

If such actions are in keeping with Russias existing operational doctrine, at least in situations where they have particular geopolitical sensitivities, is there any reasonable hope of coaxing the Kremlin into a framework that mitigates operational risk? Proposing a deconfliction framework might be a way forward. But first we need to define deconfliction.

Defined Right, Deconfliction Could Be the Answer

Deconfliction is a term whose use has recently been expanded beyond its original meaning, and that semantic change is itself an obstacle to addressing the problem of risky encounters with the Russian military or anybody else for that matter. In my experience, deconfliction in the aerial domain was part of the pre-strike and mission planning process, with a central authority acting as a clearinghouse that distributes taskings to squadrons, which then carried them out. These orders incorporated measures to preclude friendly-fire accidents or collisions by allocating routes, altitudes, timing blocks, and specific geographic sectors to different participants in ones own forces.

The problem here is that traditional deconfliction planning assumes a priori that everybody has a collective interest in assuring its success. But, when it comes to operational dealings with the Russian armed forces as manifested in the Syrian-Iraqi hot war zone, that has usually not been true. For example, as the war in Syria unfolded, the Russian military largely ignored and ultimately withdrew from a humanitarian deconfliction agreement with the United Nations that was set up to head off strikes against hospitals, schools, and other civilian infrastructure. While that agreement was in force, the Russian Air Force made numerous attacks on those very sites with horrific consequences.

Now calls for deconfliction hotlines from senior U.S. military commanders suggest the term has morphed into attempting to coordinate in real time between red and blue military forces to deal with unanticipated and potentially lethal encounters of the kinds discussed above. This is not deconfliction in the strict sense coordinating in advance and, anyway, using a hotline failed in many cases in the Syria-Iraq theater to resolve unfolding critical incidents involving Russian forces. This is not to suggest that mechanisms for dealing with emergent situations are a bad idea. In an important paper on managing escalation risk at sea, Liselotte Odgaard and Sune Lund provide a guide to adapting existing agreements on that problem to the NATO-Russian case, but, again, this is post-encounter planning.

So, given this definitional mess and an opponent unwilling to abide strictly by the rules, how should the United States and NATO proceed with the Russian military if the goal is to minimize situations where the only recourse now is a problematic hotline system? Unfortunately, the overall tense state of U.S.-Russian relations and the suspension of most military-to-military contacts between NATO and Russia after the Ukraine crisis of 2014 make an omnibus fix a very difficult prospect.

Back to basics might be one way to begin. In 2014, the European Leadership Network initiated an ambitious project to examine and implement a series of measures that would put in place far-ranging measures to regularize risk reduction in Baltic airspace. The United States should build and cooperate on that effort and urge NATO and Russia to establish a working group to construct a memorandum of understanding for deconfliction management that includes validating procedures for air intercepts and naval encounters. Then, as a practical matter, the two parties should agree on standing up virtual deconfliction coordination cells to deal with flight or route plans, use of transponders or other geolocation methods, and common radio frequencies. Having senior officers on call to sort out exigent problems would be the backup should deconfliction fail. Finally, as a trial arrangement, selecting one specific area (e.g., the Baltic region) to assess the workability of any such arrangements would test not only the system, but also the commitment of the Russians to make it work.

Biden suggested that constructively engaging Moscow when it suits U.S. national security interests should be seen as a possible win for both sides. The scale and scope of the dangerous encounters problem should be viewed in that light and with a sense of urgency. Otherwise, the risks of a disastrous accident increase, and the escalation consequences thereof will be very difficult to contain.

Ralph S. Clem is a senior fellow at the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University. He also served as an Air Force Reserve intelligence officer in a fighter squadron and wing, and at national agency level before retiring as a major general.

Image: U.S. European Command

S&P Global to assess defaults of countries using G20 debt relief plan – KFGO News posted at 20:27:39 UTC

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The News And Times.

Feed Integration by RSS Dog.


____________________________________________________________________________

Michael Novakhov – SharedNewsLinks℠ | In Brief | 


Spread the News